• Luton is one of four districts in the East of England region that has had the highest increase in terms of deprivation ranking and Luton is recorded as being in the 20-40% most deprived areas [in the Region].
  • The Index of Multiple Deprivation 2007 classifies High Town Ward, the home of LIF, in 1 of Luton’s 6 most deprived and priority areas
  • Luton’s unemployment and economic deprivation records above national average, 8% of Luton residents have never worked; double the national average
  • 20% of the Irish community are aged 65 or older, of which 21% live alone
  • High numbers of the Irish community are not working because of permanent sickness or disability
  • Irish men are more likely than their British counterparts to be single, divorced, separated or widowed from the age of 50 onwards
  • The Irish have the highest levels of cancer of any minority ethnic group in Britain and resulting deaths is greatly higher than the national average
  • The Irish in Britain experience significant health inequalities – the only immigrant group whose physical and mental health deteriorates after leaving our own country and settling in Britain. These health problems continue to be experienced by 2nd and 3rd generations of Irish migrants.
  • One-in-five Irish people carry a gene causing haemochromatosis – a liver disease frequently misdiagnosed
  • Irish people in Britain suffer a disproportionately high incidence of mental health conditions
  • Because of the older age profile of the Irish in Britain, memory loss and dementia are key issues for the Irish community, the scale of which is exacerbated by the poor levels of access to services and resultant isolation
  • There are significant numbers of older Irish men living in isolation in poor quality private accommodation
  • Irish men feel their work has affected their health